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Implied NowhereAbsence in Folklore Studies$
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Shelley Ingram, Willow G. Mullins, and Todd Richardson

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781496822956

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2020

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496822956.001.0001

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The #Landmass between New Orleans and Mobile: Neglect, Race, and the Cost of Invisibility

The #Landmass between New Orleans and Mobile: Neglect, Race, and the Cost of Invisibility

Chapter:
(p.125) The #Landmass between New Orleans and Mobile: Neglect, Race, and the Cost of Invisibility
Source:
Implied Nowhere
Author(s):

Shelley Ingram

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496822956.003.0009

In 2012, a forecaster on The Weather Channel allegedly reported that an incoming hurricane was a threat to “the landmass between New Orleans and Mobile.” The folklore of the “landmass” internet meme cycle that followed, in which residents of the Mississippi Gulf Coast mocked their own invisibility from mainstream consciousness, could easily be dismissed as an inconsequential bit of fun. However, this chapter argues that the meme is part of a larger pattern of expressive culture that, when examined, reveals lingering trauma from Hurricane Katrina and the disturbing systems of oppression—racial, economic, cultural—still at work in the region and, consequently, the nation.

Keywords:   Hurricane Katrina, meme, trauma

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