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Downtown Mardi GrasNew Carnival Practices in Post-Katrina New Orleans$
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Leslie A. Wade, Robin Roberts, and Frank de Caro

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781496823786

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2020

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496823786.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

Size Matters: ’tit Rǝx

Size Matters: ’tit Rǝx

Chapter:
(p.89) Chapter 3 Size Matters: ’tit Rǝx
Source:
Downtown Mardi Gras
Author(s):

Robin Roberts

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496823786.003.0004

This chapter focuses on a parade that through its name and practice presents an inversion of traditional Mardi Gras’s emphasis on excess. The ’tit Rəx parade offers an ironic twist on the gigantic, expensive, and traditional krewe and parade, Rex, whose king is THE King of Carnival, and whose parade runs the traditional Uptown route. Using interviews and images, this chapter analyzes ’tit Rəx through representative participants and floats. ’tit Rəx provides an example of how parades can be read as resisting and revising traditional Carnival. Like the other new parades, ’tit Rəx raises issues of gender and class. ’tit Rəx also accords with Errol Laborde’s observation that “downtowns are inherently adult” (55), as this Downtown parade is salacious in aspect. While ’tit Rəx floats are tiny, evoking schoolchildren’s Mardi Gras floats made from shoeboxes, they are political and often sexually explicit.

Keywords:   Miniaturization, Gender, Art, Housing crisis, Rex

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