Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Conscripts of MigrationNeoliberal Globalization, Nationalism, and the Literature of New African Diasporas$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Ian Foster

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781496824219

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2020

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496824219.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 18 May 2022

The “Condition D’immigrés” in Fatou Diome’s the Belly of the Atlantic and the Aesthetics of Migration in the Francophone African Literary Tradition

The “Condition D’immigrés” in Fatou Diome’s the Belly of the Atlantic and the Aesthetics of Migration in the Francophone African Literary Tradition

Chapter:
(p.51) Chapter 3 The “Condition D’immigrés” in Fatou Diome’s the Belly of the Atlantic and the Aesthetics of Migration in the Francophone African Literary Tradition
Source:
Conscripts of Migration
Author(s):

Christopher Ian Foster

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496824219.003.0003

Through an analysis of Fatou Diome’s 2010 novel The Belly of the Atlantic, this chapter rethinks Jacques Chevrier’s definition of migritude, which he describes as a recent cohort of African writers in France who narrate existence between Africa and France and for whom immigration and exile are central themes. The chapter argues more narrowly that migritude writers disclose what Diome terms the “condition d’immigres”; that is, they image the conditions and structures of immigration as a national and international network of systems expropriating the means of movement from formerly colonized peoples and that these systems have a colonial past. In addition, it unpacks Diome’s conversations with the Négritude tradition, noting that, at the same time she borrows from her authors, she refashions aspects of Négritude in terms of migration. She reappropriates, for example, Léopold Sédar Senghor’s black humanism, and mobilizes it into her global twenty-first century as a migrant humanism challenging immigration under neoliberal globalization.

Keywords:   Migritude, FatouDiome, Imperialism, Globalization, Africa, Négritude

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.