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Cooperatives in New OrleansCollective Action and Urban Development$
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Anne Gessler

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781496827616

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2021

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496827616.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 10 May 2021

Albert Dent and the Free Southern Theater: Intergenerational Civil Rights Cooperatives and the Fight Against Racialized Economic Inequality

Albert Dent and the Free Southern Theater: Intergenerational Civil Rights Cooperatives and the Fight Against Racialized Economic Inequality

Chapter:
(p.115) Chapter 4 Albert Dent and the Free Southern Theater: Intergenerational Civil Rights Cooperatives and the Fight Against Racialized Economic Inequality
Source:
Cooperatives in New Orleans
Author(s):

Anne Gessler

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496827616.003.0005

Chapter four follows African American activists generational shift away from black-run Rochdale businesses toward racial justice cooperatives that experimented with communist rhetoric, non-hierarchical collective structures, and African diasporic spiritual and aesthetic practices. Between the 1930s and 1940s, Albert Dent fused southern civil rights activism and global cooperative philosophy to create the Flint-Goodridge Hospital insurance cooperative and public health plan for black patients. Collaborating with white southern New Deal liberals allowed Dent to implement black economic justice and self-advocacy at the city and state level. Between the 1960s and 1980s, writer and playwright Tom Dent incorporated his father’s coalitional strategies into the leftist Free Southern Theater Collective’s cooperative vision. While based in black Ninth Ward and Central City neighborhoods, it worked with local and national antipoverty officials and non-profit organizations to expand a southern network of theatrical, producer, and consumer cooperatives empowering impoverished African Americans without replicating capitalism’s abuses.

Keywords:   Albert Dent, Thomas Dent, Free Southern Theater, Civil rights movement, Flint-Goodridge Hospital

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