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Critical Directions in Comics Studies$
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Thomas Giddens

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781496828996

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2021

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496828996.001.0001

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“Destructive Interim Formation”

“Destructive Interim Formation”

Chapter:
(p.221) 10 “Destructive Interim Formation”
Source:
Critical Directions in Comics Studies
Author(s):

Thomas Giddens

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496828996.003.0010

This chapter seeks to invoke the graceful and relentless violence of John Hicklenton’s 100 Months in a bombardment of theoretical elaboration that, with Benjamin, explores the violent quality of critique: created in Hicklenton’s final moments before ending his own life at Dignitas. 100 Months tears down the perception that capitalism has made the world dehumanized, commodified, and godless, and portrays the journey of Mara—the soul of the Earth—in her relentless evisceration of the ‘Longpig paradise’ that represents the cannibalization of the subject under the pursuit of profit, of capital, of coin, and whilst Mara may be the ‘feminine destructive principle’, the ‘end of all things’, amidst the blood and horror, the splatter and sinew, her trajectory presents a change that indicates her temporary form, thus reflecting the violent and temporary quality of critique itself: ‘You may call me … the destructive interim formation’.

Keywords:   100 Months, Violence, Critique, Benjamin, Capitalism

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