Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Outside and InsideRace and Identity in White Jazz Autobiography$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Reva Marin

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781496829979

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2021

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496829979.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Race and Place and the Construction of Jazz Authenticity: New Orleanian Autobiographers Tom Sancton and “Wingy” Manone

Race and Place and the Construction of Jazz Authenticity: New Orleanian Autobiographers Tom Sancton and “Wingy” Manone

Chapter:
(p.59) 3 Race and Place and the Construction of Jazz Authenticity: New Orleanian Autobiographers Tom Sancton and “Wingy” Manone
Source:
Outside and Inside
Author(s):

Reva Marin

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496829979.003.0003

This chapter considers accounts of jazz interracialism offered by New Orleanian-raised musicians Tom Sancton and “Wingy” Manone. Although separated by two generations and sharply divergent socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, Manone and Sancton both foreground the significance of their immersion experiences in New Orleans’ complex multiracial and multicultural environments in shaping their views on race and jazz authenticity. In contrast to Bob Wilber’s colorblind view of jazz history and his geographical distance from New Orleans, Manone and Sancton establish race and place as key to their constructions of their jazz selves. Their rich descriptions of the cultural practices and landmarks of New Orleans—the second line, fish fries, the blackberry woman, Preservation Hall, among others—offer compelling evidence of the city’s unique cultural mixing that was central to the development of jazz.

Keywords:   New Orleans, multicultural, second line, Preservation Hall, race and place

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.