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The Green DepressionAmerican Ecoliterature in the 1930s and 1940s$
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Matthew M. Lambert

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781496830401

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2021

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496830401.001.0001

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Back to the Land

Back to the Land

Chapter:
(p.59) Chapter 2 Back to the Land
Source:
The Green Depression
Author(s):

Matthew M. Lambert

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496830401.003.0003

This chapter focuses on ways that southern depression-era authors contributed or responded to a renewed interest in the “old” South during the period. While the Southern Agrarians, William Alexander Percy, and filmmakers like Victor Fleming and William Wyler created nostalgic depictions of antebellum southern life, Richard Wright and Erskine Caldwell responded with “antipastoral” depictions of sharecropping that expose the exploitive social, economic, and environmental effects of plantation agriculture. The chapter also identifies ways that Zora Neale Hurston creates alternative forms of social and environmental thought through her depictions of African American folklore in Mules and Men (1935).

Keywords:   African American folklore, Sharecropping, Flooding, Pastoral, Southern Agrarians

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