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No Future in This CountryThe Prophetic Pessimism of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner$
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Andre E. Johnson

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781496830708

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2021

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496830708.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

“Negroes Should Worship a God Who Is a Negro”

“Negroes Should Worship a God Who Is a Negro”

The Making of a Black Rhetorical Theologian

Chapter:
(p.45) 2 “Negroes Should Worship a God Who Is a Negro”
Source:
No Future in This Country
Author(s):

Andre E. Johnson

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496830708.003.0003

This chapter offers a brief sketch of the theological thought, or more specifically, the God-Talk language of Turner. The chapter then offers a rhetorical analysis of the text and argues that Turner engages in what some scholars call rhetorical theology. By maintaining that all theology is at its core a form of argument, rhetorical theology places emphasis on how a speaker or writer situates language in order to persuade its hearers to a certain position. In other words, when Turner spoke and wrote “God is a Negro,” he was not doing systematic theology; he was engaged in a public theology, which is a rhetorical enterprise that had as its aim a persuasive function within a specific context.

Keywords:   Rhetorical Theology, Black Theology, Rhetoric, Religion, Theology

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