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RediasporizationAfrican-Guyanese Kweh-Kweh$
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Gillian Richards-Greaves

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781496831156

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2021

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496831156.001.0001

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“Where’s the Cookup Rice?”

“Where’s the Cookup Rice?”

Extracting the “African” and Reconstructing “Home” through Food

Chapter:
(p.29) 2 “Where’s the Cookup Rice?”
Source:
Rediasporization
Author(s):

Gillian Richards-Greaves

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496831156.003.0002

This chapter examines how African-Guyanese-Americans police the boundaries of “Guyanese food” at Come to My Kwe-Kwe to “remember,” to articulate Blackness, and to facilitate rediasporization. It also demonstrates the delicate balance established between the desires of the attendees and the financial goals of vendors who provide Come to My Kwe-Kwe meals. Diverse cuisines are sold at Come to My Kwe-Kwe, but attendees who are accustomed to eating Guyanese food, or are familiar with the traditional kweh-kweh, often attend the ritual expecting to consume African-influenced Guyanese cuisines, like cookup rice, metemgee, and conkee. This chapter also explores how migration and the changing needs and desires of the African-Guyanese community simultaneously facilitate destruction and innovations of Guyanese cuisines. Ultimately, this chapter articulates Come to My Kwe-Kwe foods simultaneously to diminish the symbolic distance between diasporas and homelands and establish new distances through cost, culinary innovations, and a changing African-Guyanese community.

Keywords:   Guyanese food, cookup rice, migration, diaspora, rediasporization

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