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That's Got 'Em!The Life and Music of Wilbur C. Sweatman$
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Mark Berresford

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781604730999

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604730999.001.0001

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Ev’rybody’s Crazy ’bout the Doggone Blues

Ev’rybody’s Crazy ’bout the Doggone Blues

Chapter:
(p.85) Chapter 8 Ev’rybody’s Crazy ’bout the Doggone Blues
Source:
That's Got 'Em!
Author(s):

Mark Berresford

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604730999.003.0008

This chapter describes Sweatman’s recording career. In December 1916 Sweatman visited the studios of the Emerson Phonograph Company in midtown Manhattan and cut the first jazz records. On the strength of his reputation in vaudeville, he was asked to record two numbers. One was a popular song of the day, “My Hawaiian Sunshine,” on which Sweatman was accompanied by a studio band; the other title was his own “Down Home Rag.” Jazz is heard for the first time on record on the latter title. In 1917 Sweatman recorded six sides for the Pathé Frères Phonograph Company and recorded for Columbia in the 1918–20 period. His band can also be heard, albeit anonymously, on the Little Wonder record label.

Keywords:   Wilbur C. Sweatman, African American musicians, recordings, jazz, Emerson Phonograph Company, Pathé Frères, Little Wonder

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