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Mississippi in the Civil WarThe Home Front$
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Timothy B. Smith

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781604734294

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604734294.001.0001

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“I Have Borne It All Very Cheerfully, So Far”

“I Have Borne It All Very Cheerfully, So Far”

Chapter:
(p.160) Chapter Nine “I Have Borne It All Very Cheerfully, So Far”
Source:
Mississippi in the Civil War
Author(s):

Timothy B. Smith

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604734294.003.0010

This chapter looks at the women of the state, exploring the often-held myth that Confederate women were totally united against the enemy. In reality, Mississippi women possessed varying degrees of loyalty to the Confederacy. The major Union invasions beginning in 1863 touched countless thousands of Mississippi women who were home alone with children while the men were in the army or hiding with the family’s valuables and livestock in a nearby swamp. Mississippians learned early on that the Federals were less likely to kill women and burn occupied dwellings. Thus the women of the state, not the men, met the enemy the majority of the time on the home front. But as these meetings became more and more frequent, the will of the women at home also began to fade.

Keywords:   Confederate women, Union invasions, Federals, will

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