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Culture after the HurricanesRhetoric and Reinvention on the Gulf Coast$
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M. B. Hackler

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781604734904

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604734904.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 02 April 2020

Making Groceries

Making Groceries

Food, Neighborhood Markets, and Neighborhood Recovery in Post-Katrina New Orleans

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter 4 Making Groceries
Source:
Culture after the Hurricanes
Author(s):

Jeffrey Schwartz

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604734904.003.0005

This chapter focuses on how the grocery industry has managed so far in post-Katrina New Orleans. It begins with the publication on yahoo.com on August 30, 2005, of two photographs showing people wading through the floodwaters, both carrying groceries. The only difference between them was that one was of a young black man, while the other was of two young white adults. It was the captioning of both photographs, however, that caught the public eye, as the African American man is said to have “looted” from a grocery, whereas the white couple merely “found” their bread and soda in the same store, the Circle Food Store — a store that has yet to reopen three years after the storm. This whole episode raises questions that are specific to New Orleans, but have much wider implications about the relationship of food access to urban development. This chapter thus explores the political, social, and economic significance of the number of neighborhood markets that were created in New Orleans as a response to Hurricane Katrina.

Keywords:   grocery industry, post-Katrina New Orleans, Circle Food Store, food access, urban development, neighborhood markets

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