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The Rise of the American Comics ArtistCreators and Contexts$
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Paul Williams and James Lyons

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781604737929

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604737929.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 01 August 2021

Feminine latin/o American Identities on the American Alternative landscape: From the Women of love and rockets to la Perdida

Feminine latin/o American Identities on the American Alternative landscape: From the Women of love and rockets to la Perdida

Chapter:
(p.164) Chapter Ten Feminine latin/o American Identities on the American Alternative landscape: From the Women of love and rockets to la Perdida
Source:
The Rise of the American Comics Artist
Author(s):

Ana Merino

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604737929.003.0012

This chapter examines the work of the Hernandez brothers and contextualizes these creators within “contemporary women’s comics” and the way different material contexts of production invoke particular reading communities. It discusses the Hernandez brothers’ legacy in the work of Jessica Abel regarding the terrain of feminine identities of Latino Americans. The chapter explains how Abel, conscious of the weight and importance of Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez’s comics, sought to articulate feminine identity within the parameters of a fictional comics narrative in her work, La Perdida. Gilbert and Jaime were credited for rejuvenating alternative comics by breaking with the autobiographical trends of the countercultural comix. In 1981, they entered the field with their self-published comic Love and Rockets. The chapter demonstrates how Abel and the Hernandez brothers try to represent the range of possibilities for creating characters at the point where Latina femininity crosses the boundaries of gender and nationhood.

Keywords:   comics, Hernandez brothers, contemporary women’s comics, Jessica Abel, feminine identity, La Perdida, alternative comics, Latino Americans, Love and Rockets, gender

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