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The Caribbean Novel since 1945Cultural Practice, Form, and the Nation-State$
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Michael Niblett

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781617032479

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617032479.001.0001

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“No Pain like This Body”: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in a Time of Crisis

“No Pain like This Body”: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in a Time of Crisis

Chapter:
(p.175) 5 “No Pain like This Body”: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in a Time of Crisis
Source:
The Caribbean Novel since 1945
Author(s):

Michael Niblett

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617032479.003.0006

This chapter explores how the utopian imaginings of the texts considered in Chapter 4 remain unfulfilled in the contemporary Caribbean as a result of the continuation both of imperialist exploitation and of internal problems such as ethnic conflict and parasitic indigenous elites. It begins by reexamining some of the themes broached in Chapter 4 in terms of Francophone Indo-Caribbean literature. The chapter then switches to the Anglophone Caribbean to examine work from the 1980s, 1990s, and the first decade of the twenty-first century by a series of women writers, including Oonya Kempadoo, Margaret Cezair-Thompson, Michelle Cliff, and Shani Mootoo, whose novels mediate the crises suffered by the nation-state since the 1970s through the lens of gender relations and issues of sexuality. It also examines the particular problems that confronted Cuba following the collapse of the Soviet Union after 1989. The chapter concludes by considering the claims of regionalism while continuing to insist on the importance of the nation-state to any effort to combat the imperialist logic of global capital.

Keywords:   utopia, Caribbean, imperialism, ethnic conflict, Oonya Kempadoo, Margaret Cezair-Thompson, Michelle Cliff, Shani Mootoo, Cuba, regionalism

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