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Faulkner and FormalismReturns of the Text$
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Annette Trefzer and Ann J. Abadie

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781617032561

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617032561.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 30 March 2020

Faulkner’s Figures

Faulkner’s Figures

Speech, Writing, and The Marionettes

Chapter:
(p.41) Faulkner’s Figures
Source:
Faulkner and Formalism
Author(s):

Serena Haygood Blount

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617032561.003.0003

This chapter examines William Faulkner’s early experiments with texts and textuality in his play The Marionettes as a training ground for an aesthetic intensely concerned with “meditations on language and literary production.” It analyzes the dynamics of the characters, Pierrot and Shade of Pierrot, Marietta and the Marionettes, as well as the complex and contradictory relationship between these figures. The chapter shows how Faulkner makes visible their emptiness and status as characters in language. It also considers Faulkner’s use of calligraphy and illustration, which turns him into a mime of Aubrey Beardsley, and explains how the returns of the text signify the inscriptions and reinscriptions of character.

Keywords:   textuality, William Faulkner, Marionettes, language, literary production, characters, calligraphy, illustration, Aubrey Beardsley

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