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The Black Cultural FrontBlack Writers and Artists of the Depression Generation$
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Brian Dolinar

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781617032691

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617032691.001.0001

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When a Man Sees Red

When a Man Sees Red

Langston Hughes and the Simple Stories

Chapter:
(p.70) (p.71) Chapter 2 When a Man Sees Red
Source:
The Black Cultural Front
Author(s):

Brian Dolinar

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617032691.003.0003

This chapter demonstrates how the Simple Stories came from Langston Hughes’s desire to create a working-class character for a working-class audience. In a 1945 article for Phylon magazine titled “Simple and Me,” Hughes explained the origins of his popular creation. According to him, Simple grew from a conversation he had been having for many years of “myself talking to me” or “me talking to myself,” but which had taken place in many forms, “from poetry to prose, song lyrics to radio, newspaper columns to books.” Few scholars have fully addressed the many literary modes in which Hughes operated.

Keywords:   working-class character, working-class audience, Simple Stories, Langston Hughes, literary modes

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