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The Black Cultural FrontBlack Writers and Artists of the Depression Generation$
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Brian Dolinar

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781617032691

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617032691.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Keeping the Memory of Survival Alive

Chapter:
(p.224) (p.225) Conclusion
Source:
The Black Cultural Front
Author(s):

Brian Dolinar

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617032691.003.0006

This book concludes by placing the works of Langston Hughes, Ollie Harrington, and Chester Himes against the background of the left-wing political movement that nurtured several black writers and artists. In their works, they advanced an unrelenting race and class critique. By revisiting their creations, one can see evidence of an enduring radicalism that extended beyond the dates of the Depression. Today’s African American artists have looked back to this generation for examples of how to produce work that can have an impact. In recent years, a cottage industry of African American popular literature has emerged. The bestselling success of Terry McMillan’s books—Waiting to Exhale and How Stella Got her Groove Back—awakened the white publishing industry to an untapped market.

Keywords:   left-wing political movement, black writers, class critique, radicalism, Depression

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