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Twain's BrandHumor in Contemporary American Culture$
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Judith Yaross Lee

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781617036439

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617036439.001.0001

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Twain’s Brand and the Modern Mood

Twain’s Brand and the Modern Mood

Chapter:
(p.3) Chapter One Twain’s Brand and the Modern Mood
Source:
Twain's Brand
Author(s):

Judith Yaross Lee

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617036439.003.0001

This chapter shows that, although Mark Twain tops most lists of great American humorists, analyses of his significance treat American culture as if humor were barely part of it. One of the likely reasons for this is the belief that Twain’s humor belongs to a trivial nineteenth-century popular culture of dialect writing, hoaxes, and tall yarns, while his themes, especially race and politics, belong to the twentieth-century canon of belle lettres. This book shows that Samuel L. Clemens adapted nineteenth-century comic traditions to burgeoning twentieth-century cultural trends in ways that won popular and economic success in his own time, expressed modern views of self and society, and anticipated contemporary American humor and culture in many ways.

Keywords:   belle letters, Mark Twain, American humorists, Samuel L. Clemens, comic traditions, cultural trends

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