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Desi DivasPolitical Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances$
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Christine L. Garlough

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781617037320

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617037320.001.0001

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National Recognition and Community Acknowledgment

National Recognition and Community Acknowledgment

Chapter:
(p.73) Chapter Three National Recognition and Community Acknowledgment
Source:
Desi Divas
Author(s):

Christine L. Garlough

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617037320.003.0003

This chapter examines and explores an event called the Festival of Nations, which showcases a myriad of folk demonstrations that range from African American doll making to Iranian rug weaving. The festival is a rich pool of ideas and insights into issues of immigration and ethnicity, and provides a chance to engage with scholarly critiques of multiculturalism in the context of a festival. Also present in this festival are performances that can be interpreted through postcolonial feminist critiques, focusing mainly on the ways that women have often been constructed through ideas of family and home, within Indian nationalist discourses. This chapter thus seeks to revisit and reexamine the site of this festival to reflect upon the question of how the School for Indian Languages and Cultures (SILC), through the enactment of women’s folk art, emerged as a women’s performative space that facilitated acknowledgement.

Keywords:   Festival of Nations, folk demonstrations, multiculturalism, immigration, ethnicity, postcolonial feminist critiques, Indian nationalist discourses, women’s folk art, women’s performative space

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