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Plotting ApocalypseReading, Agency, and Identity in the Left Behind Series$
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Jennie Chapman

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781617039034

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617039034.001.0001

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. Queering the Apocalypse

. Queering the Apocalypse

Homosocial, Homophobic, and Homoerotic Subjectivities in Left Behind

Chapter:
(p.154) 8. Queering the Apocalypse
Source:
Plotting Apocalypse
Author(s):

Jennie Chapman

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617039034.003.0009

This chapter further develops the previous chapter’s focus on gender by turning its attention to depictions of men and masculinity in Left Behind, and the ramifications of these representations for contemporary evangelical culture. It notes that, in contrast to the relatively progressive positions the series takes on race, it is less than open-minded on sexuality. Thus, the series contains a number of homophobic representations of gay people, particularly gay men, which characterize homosexuality as aberrant, unnatural, and even monstrous. At the same time, the series frequently depicts moments of intense homosocial intimacy between evangelical men, and between evangelical men and Jesus, the latter of which are erotically charged. The chapter seeks to make sense of the tension between the homophobic and the homoerotic in the wider context of changing sexual mores in contemporary American evangelicalism.

Keywords:   Men, Masculinity, Homophobia, Homoerotic, Homosocial

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