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Race and the Obama PhenomenonThe Vision of a More Perfect Multiracial Union$
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G. Reginald Daniel and Hettie V. Williams

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628460216

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2015

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628460216.001.0001

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The “Outsider” and the Presidency

The “Outsider” and the Presidency

Mediated Representations of Race and Gender in the 2008 Presidential Primaries

Chapter:
(p.201) 10. The “Outsider” and the Presidency
Source:
Race and the Obama Phenomenon
Author(s):

Tessa Ditonto

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628460216.003.0010

This chapter argues that questions of identity for Barack Obama and Hilary Clinton were particularly prevalent in the media in the 2008 Presidential primaries. This was attributable to the exceptional nature of a contest in which, for the first time, either a member of a racial minority group or a woman was assured to win their party’s nomination. That candidate was also thought to have a real chance of winning the general election. Beneath alternately scathing and glowing editorials, analyses of policy positions, and even articles focused only explicitly on the “horse race”—i.e., which candidate is winning, and where—were questions of identity, advocacy, and each candidate’s ability to legitimately represent the interests of the various groups whose votes they hoped to win.

Keywords:   Barack Obama, Race, Gender, Hillary Clinton, Mediated Representations

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