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Women Artists of the Harlem Renaissance$
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Amy Helene Kirschke

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628460339

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2015

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628460339.001.0001

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Laura Wheeler Waring and the Women Illustrators of the Harlem Renaissance

Laura Wheeler Waring and the Women Illustrators of the Harlem Renaissance

Chapter:
(p.85) Chapter Four Laura Wheeler Waring and the Women Illustrators of the Harlem Renaissance
Source:
Women Artists of the Harlem Renaissance
Author(s):

Amy Helene Kirschke

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628460339.003.0005

This chapter discusses the work of painter Laura Wheeler Waring, who was the most frequently featured woman artist in Crisis, the first significant national African American magazine. She was born in Hartford, Connecticut, received teacher training at the Cheyney Training School for Teachers, and studied painting at Academie de la Grand Chaumiere in Paris. She won first prize at the Harmon Foundation in 1927 and a bronze medal from the same institution in 1930. When Du Bois was editor of Crisis, her illustrations in the magazine showed African life, women, and children but never political life. She also served as illustrator for short stories, poems, essays, and featured articles. Some of these were written by Rudolph Fisher, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Jessie Fauset, and James Weldon Johnson. She created covers for the December/January issues of Crisis, celebrating Christmas and the Epiphany. Opportunity was another prominent African American magazine but it employed fewer visual artists and especially fewer women. A few were employed including Jessie Housley, Maude Tousey Fangel, Georgette Seabrook, Mary Tarleton, and Louise Jefferson.

Keywords:   Crisis, Opportunity, Academie de la Grand Chaumiere, Rudolph Fisher, Mary Tarleton, Louise Jefferson

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