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Critical Interventions in Caribbean Politics and Theory$
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Brian Meeks

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628461213

Published to University Press of Mississippi: September 2015

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628461213.001.0001

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Cuba from Due South (2012)

Cuba from Due South (2012)

Chapter:
(p.98) 8. Cuba from Due South (2012)
Source:
Critical Interventions in Caribbean Politics and Theory
Author(s):

Brian Meeks

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628461213.003.0008

This chapter presents an evolving worldview of Fidel Castro's Cuban Revolution, as well as the political and economic relationship between Jamaica and Cuba. During the nineteenth century, Cuban independence fighters sought refuge in Jamaica, after which they introduced tobacco planting techniques to the locals. From an Anglo-Caribbean perspective, the most important aspect of the Cuba-Jamaica relations was the northward movement of West Indians to work in the Cuban sugar industry. In general, there was neither automatic acceptance of revolutionary Cuba in Jamaica nor solidarity with the Cuban political system. Castro and Cuba represent in Jamaica a sense of audacity, of resistance to power, which influenced the Jamaican ruudbwai or street gangster of the sixties.

Keywords:   Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro, Cuba-Jamaica relations, Cuban political system, ruudbwai

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