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Contesting Post-RacialismConflicted Churches in the United States and South Africa$
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R. Drew Smith, William Ackah, Anthony G. Reddie, and Rothney S. Tshaka

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628462005

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2016

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628462005.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 13 July 2020

In Search of a Transforming Public Theology: Drinking from the Wells of Black Theology

In Search of a Transforming Public Theology: Drinking from the Wells of Black Theology

Chapter:
(p.211) In Search of a Transforming Public Theology: Drinking from the Wells of Black Theology
Source:
Contesting Post-Racialism
Author(s):

Nico Koopman

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628462005.003.0013

This chapter challenges Public Theology to draw on the emphasis within Black Theology on the involvement of God in the affairs of this world, and specifically the notion that God reveals Godself as the God who is identifying primarily, though not exclusively, with the poor and the wronged. The second crucial emphasis of Black Theology is the confession of the lordship of Jesus Christ over all dimensions and sectors of life - from the most intimate and personal to the most public, global and cosmic. To be a transforming and liberating Public Theology the vision, aim and methodology need to be informed by central convictions about God’s bias in favor of the wronged and against oppression, and about the Lordship of Jesus Christ within a world pervaded by a spirit and structures of empire.

Keywords:   Black Theology, Public Theology, poverty, empire, hybridity

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