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Contesting Post-RacialismConflicted Churches in the United States and South Africa$
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R. Drew Smith, William Ackah, Anthony G. Reddie, and Rothney S. Tshaka

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628462005

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2016

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628462005.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

“They Must Have a Different God Than Our God”: Towards a Lived Theology of Black Churchwomen during the United States Civil Rights Movement

“They Must Have a Different God Than Our God”: Towards a Lived Theology of Black Churchwomen during the United States Civil Rights Movement

Chapter:
(p.111) “They Must Have a Different God Than Our God”: Towards a Lived Theology of Black Churchwomen during the United States Civil Rights Movement
Source:
Contesting Post-Racialism
Author(s):

AnneMarie Mingo

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628462005.003.0006

Both prior to and subsequent to the emergence of black liberation-oriented theological constructions in the mid-1960s, few black women were given access to the hallowed halls of academia in the manner of professional theologians or to prominent pulpits, yet many women worked out a lived theology of justice and freedom within the Movement as they experienced unjust practices in their encounters with white Christians. As a result of personal revelations of God, which are known through daily living, a lived theology addresses concrete and practical aspects rather than distant theories and shapes ways of ethically engaging the world. In this chapter, as one component of the construction of a lived theology of justice and freedom, the lived experiences of both individuals and communities are considered through transformative on-the-ground encounters during the Civil Rights Movement.

Keywords:   activist women, lived theology, Civil Rights Movement, racism, liberation

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