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Contesting Post-RacialismConflicted Churches in the United States and South Africa$
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R. Drew Smith, William Ackah, Anthony G. Reddie, and Rothney S. Tshaka

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628462005

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2016

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628462005.001.0001

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Black South African Christian Response to Afrophobia in Contemporary South Africa

Black South African Christian Response to Afrophobia in Contemporary South Africa

Chapter:
(p.130) Black South African Christian Response to Afrophobia in Contemporary South Africa
Source:
Contesting Post-Racialism
Author(s):

Rothney S. Tshaka

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628462005.003.0008

This chapter argues that the apologetics of black theology of liberation, evidenced by its wrestling with method, produced an obsession. This obsession resulted in the alienation of this alternative hermeneutics in black communities and created a rift between itself and its interlocutors. Preoccupation with method hampered black theology of liberation from dealing with burning issues. Since black theology of liberation in some instances failed to critically engage Western hegemonies and power, it was incapable of dealing with issues that could have rolled back the flight from the black self. The willingness by the oppressed to participate in their own oppression remains a painful pathology related to scandalous social ills such as Afrophobia. Violence against the black other is ill-informed and should rather be directed at the hegemonic powers of capitalism and neoliberalism. We need a theology that is willing to listen earnestly to its interlocutors.

Keywords:   Afrophobia, Black Liberation Theology, Hegemony, Racism, South Africa

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