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Resisting ParadiseTourism, Diaspora, and Sexuality in Caribbean Culture$
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Angelique V. Nixon

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628462180

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628462180.001.0001

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Black Female Travel: Diasporic Connections and Revolutionary Desire

Black Female Travel: Diasporic Connections and Revolutionary Desire

Chapter:
(p.62) Chapter Three Black Female Travel: Diasporic Connections and Revolutionary Desire
Source:
Resisting Paradise
Author(s):

Angelique V. Nixon

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628462180.003.0003

The Caribbean American writers examined in chapter three, Paule Marshall and Audre Lorde, seek a spiritual home in the Caribbean, the home of their parents and ancestors. More specifically, they write and thereby claim multiple homes in transnational spaces through the Caribbean and an African diasporic identity. Both Marshall and Lorde directly challenge neocolonial discourse and tourism by creating alternative Black female travel narratives that represent diasporic travel, identity, and multiple homespaces. They both introduce new forms of tourism and possibilities for resistance to neocolonialism, while uncovering the strong continuities between the racial, sexual, and gender dynamics of colonialism (and slavery) and neocolonialism (and tourism).

Keywords:   Paule Marshall, Audre Lorde, Black Female Travel, Caribbean American Writers, Transnational Spaces

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