Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Resisting ParadiseTourism, Diaspora, and Sexuality in Caribbean Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Angelique V. Nixon

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628462180

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628462180.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 30 May 2020

Vexed Relations: The Interplay of Culture, Race, and Sex

Vexed Relations: The Interplay of Culture, Race, and Sex

Chapter:
(p.155) Chapter Six Vexed Relations: The Interplay of Culture, Race, and Sex
Source:
Resisting Paradise
Author(s):

Angelique V. Nixon

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628462180.003.0006

This chapter considers the work of three Caribbean writers Michelle Cliff, Oonya Kempadoo, and Christian Campbell, who grapple with the complexity of culture, race, and sex within the overwhelming context of neocolonial tourism and globalization. Cliff’s novel No Telephone to Heaven represents post-independence Jamaica from the 1960s to the 1980s during the rise of tourism as the model for development. The novel carefully exposes the exploitative cultural and sexual consumption of the Caribbean through representing the ways in which Jamaica and its people are packaged and sold in the film and tourist industries. Kempadoo’s novel’s Tide Running offers a seductive challenge to neocolonialism through a sharp critique of the sexual and cultural politics of tourism and the adverse effects of globalization on the island of Tobago. Through subtle and powerful metaphors, Campbell’s poems, “Groove” and “Welcome Centre” reveal the profound influence of tourism on Caribbean sexual and cultural identity, unsilencing the sexual/gendered aspects of tourist exploitation in the Bahamas.

Keywords:   Michelle Cliff, Ooyna Kempadoo, Christian Campbell, Culture, Race and Sex, Sexual and Cultural Identity

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.