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The JokerA Serious Study of the Clown Prince of Crime$
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Robert Moses Peaslee and Robert G. Weiner

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628462388

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2016

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628462388.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Kiss with a Fist

Kiss with a Fist

The Gendered Power Struggle of the Joker and Harley Quinn

Chapter:
(p.82) Kiss with a Fist
Source:
The Joker
Author(s):

Tosha Taylor

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628462388.003.0006

Tosha Taylor, in a way, provides an important response to our other contributors by considering the case of the Joker’s “henchwench,” Harley Quinn. As most analyses herein interrogate the Joker either in isolation or, more often, in comparison with his antithesis, Batman, Taylor’s piece stands alone in analyzing the Joker as a gendered being. In particular, Taylor is interested in the grotesquely abusive nature of the relationship between Harley and the Joker, which, referencing Foucault and Butler’s work, Taylor suggests “becomes a representation of the cyclical nature of gendered power struggles in which emotional and physical abuse are rooted in a desire for and a rejection of the gendered subject.” In the Joker-Harley binary, the power of the former “as male subject derives, once he has become partnered with Harley, from ritualistic performances of male-on-female subjugation.”

Keywords:   Henchwench, Harley Quinn, Joker-Harley binary, Power, Foucault

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